7K0A0155

“Can you repeat that?”

“The audio and video aren’t syncing up for me.”

“Are you presenting this webinar from inside a cave?”

Get enough people on a webinar or audio conference and you’re bound to have someone complain about stuttering, latency, or delay. You might be presenting in crystal clear audio to 99% of your attendees but all it takes is one visitor complaint through chat and suddenly you might feel like your webinar is crashing.

Take a breath.

Count to ten.

Your webinar is probably just fine.

The truth is, most of the culprits of bad audio are on the receiving side. Not your attendees themselves, of course, but their computers. Their internet connection.

There are probably a hundred things that can go wrong to slow down an attendee’s system’s reception of your audio.

Here’s just a few:

Slow Internet – Yep, this one seems obvious, but you might be surprised how common it is. When an ISP (internet service provider) delivers internet at rates slower than an attendee is used to and audio struggles to make it through at a high quality, it’s unfortunately out of their hands to repair without a call to the ISP, unless they have another network available.

Congestion – Attendees with many devices all working on the same network can create their own problems without realizing it. Say, for example, their phone begins downloading updates for apps, or their laptop in the other room is streaming the latest Beyonce track from Spotify. All those tasks working at the same time creates congestion that can create issues with audio during webinars or conferences.

Interference – When using a wireless network, external devices and even other wireless networks can create interference. This is more common than you might think, especially in office buildings where each tenant has their own wireless network.

Malware – Some kinds of malware perform uploading and downloading actions in the background, which can take up a lot of a device’s available bandwidth and create issues with streaming audio.

As you can see, all of these issues are beyond your control. Naturally, you should do your due diligence to make sure your system isn’t to blame when attendees complain about poor audio, but don’t derail your webinar trying to solve an issue that may be on just one attendee’s device.

About Marc Gutman

Marc Gutman is the Chief Events Officer at Lighthouse Conferencing. He has over ten years of experience in Conferencing and Collaboration services and is dedicated to Lighthouse's mission of being a different kind of conferencing company. When not sharing his passion for remote meetings and collaboration you can find Marc enjoying time with his wife and three small children, cycling, snowboarding, kiteboarding, playing golf and generally enjoying the outdoors of Colorado. Find Marc on and LinkedIn.

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Marc Gutman is the Chief Events Officer at Lighthouse Conferencing. He has over ten years of experience in Conferencing and Collaboration services and is dedicated to Lighthouse's mission of being a different kind of conferencing company. When not sharing his passion for remote meetings and collaboration you can find Marc enjoying time with his wife and three small children, cycling, snowboarding, kiteboarding, playing golf and generally enjoying the outdoors of Colorado. Find Marc on and LinkedIn.

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